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at npr. skip over our speaker for a moment, over the podium as well, melissa sharp with new silk media. she is our fantastic speakers committee chair. skip over our second speaker for a moment, the key to seem to press secretary with the natural resources defense council. also the organizer of today's event. we thank you for that, bob. we are told that it is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. then moving on down, andrea stone, correspondent for "huffington post." glow is washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom member and al isley is editor at large who tells me been blogging for "huffington post" since day one. now please a large amount of applause for everyone. [applause] >> if there were a king and queen of online journalism, our headline to a guest speakers could be considered candidates for members of the royal family. when tim armstrong and arianna huffington announced aol's purchase of "huffington post" in february it marked not just yet another reshaping of aol but a
are wondering where the government can cut costs. the npr came up with one idea. >> each day the u.s. treasury mints nearly $2 million in coins. coins that mostly go directly into storage. abc's john karl checked it out. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia where they seem to have more doors than "get smart." for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. it sounds a little bit like las vegas around here except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president. but nobody seems to want them. rutherford b. hayes. hot off the press, literally, these coins are still warm. made of manganese brass, they cost nearly 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about $600,000 a day to make them. and each one of these bags, 140,000 coins, $140,000, more than 2,000 pounds. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the f
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2